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Leonard "Gomez" Glick
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Posts: 8

It would be interesting to know your favorite:  bar,  restaurant.  park,  activity,  Spanish friend,  song,  or anything from Valladolid or Espana.

Near la Plaza Mayor was a bar called la Socialista where you drank wine from a porron and ate peanuts.  Or El Campero on Miquel Iscar;  down the steps;  grilled chunks of meat was a specialty.

In Segovia at the foot of the famous aquaduct is La Meson de Candido;  has tile ovens where the kings of Spain have eaten.  Lamb,  Castillian soup:  the best meal I ever had.  Check out the web site.....it has a menu and recipes.....

Riding horses in Laguna de Duero.  Spanish friend, Pepe (who knew Irma Marian from 1971 and was still pining over her) and I would take the bus to Laguna at the edge of town near the river and ride through the pine forrest.  One particular time I fell off the horse twice in one day.  Then we would wait by the highway for the bus to go back to Valladolid.  It was so memorable I wrote a song about it.     Alguna letra:   Espeando en Laguna,  En el calor del verano;   No se porque he estado enamorado,  Despues de la lluvia de ti;   No quiero terminar me estancia de aqui,  En el camino a Madrid.

If you have any Favorites,  let's hear about them........

   

January 27, 2012 at 4:10 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Joan Stossel Pun
Member
Posts: 6

My favorites?  There are so many, I could write a book.  I wish I had known about the horseback riding when I was there (if it was available) because I was crazy for riding.

Don't know the Socialista but "EL Campero" is still around/  I think it's a bar we went into with friends around semana Santa last year.  If I am not mistaken, when we were in Valladolid, it was known for its pinchos - meat on a stick and grilled.

maybe my favorite would have been bodegas that were in the basement. like El Mesón del Mar (or something like that) which was on the little street across from the smelly market.   Neither are there now.  I don't miss the market, but I do miss the bodegas where they always had a guitar and someone would play.  I am afraid that is all ancient history now.

January 27, 2012 at 9:15 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Leonard "Gomez" Glick
Member
Posts: 8

Yes,  like Joni said, "there are so many"  especially for me with the Arranz family.  One memorable time the father said he was taking us to Buenos Aires.  Francisco Arranz drove Marta (who was four ), Mike Reich (my roomate), and myself to one of the flat topped, mesa-like hills just out of the city.  I think they called them "ceros".   Don Francisco was always adventurous and liked to be active but was slowed down because of a leg problem;  but it barely slowed him down.  We drove all the way to the top.  We parked then walked around with don Francisco showing us around and pointing out parts of the city far below.  We noticed it was quite windy up there.  That's when don Francisco smiled and said that why he called it "Buenos Aires".

We finished the journey by  taking some photos.  One with Mike, Marta, and don Francisco and another with Marta, don Francisco, and myself.  Then we returned to Plaza de Espana.

I had a copy of that photo made and gave it to Marta sixteen years later in 1988 when I visited them. 

March 3, 2012 at 11:42 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Joan Stossel Pun
Member
Posts: 6

I wonder if this is the same Marta Arranz who is working with Susan Villar to arrange a visit to a winery that she works for!    My husband also has a friend who graduated with him at the facultad de medicina in Valladolid and she is Dra. Teresa Arranz.  Is that a common name there?

March 12, 2012 at 5:35 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Leonard "Gomez" Glick
Member
Posts: 8

Joni,

  Yes.  It is the same Marta,  who is working with Susan Villar.  I don't think Dra. Teresa Arranz is from the same family, but I could be wrong.

March 13, 2012 at 6:21 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Paula Husar Fromm
Member
Posts: 4
Some of my favorite moments in 1970 were spent at Noche y Dia on the Paseo de Zorilla. Several of us spent lots of time there. We did like the pinchos at El Campero. No one has mentioned a professor named Irene Vallejo, she was the other female teacher along with Maria Victoria when we were there. Don Cesar was friends with my Spanish father. I remember doing things with the family like going to Burgos for mass in the Cathedral and kneeling near the grave stone of El Cid. We(the whole group) walked to Fuensaldana one weekend and got the key to the castle and went up on the roof. It was really cool. Hoping to be in Valla in July. Loved the light story!
March 13, 2012 at 11:01 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Paula Husar Fromm
Member
Posts: 4
Some of my favorite moments in 1970 were spent at Noche y Dia on the Paseo de Zorilla. Several of us spent lots of time there. We did like the pinchos at El Campero. No one has mentioned a professor named Irene Vallejo, she was the other female teacher along with Maria Victoria when we were there. Don Cesar was friends with my Spanish father. I remember doing things with the family like going to Burgos for mass in the Cathedral and kneeling near the grave stone of El Cid. We(the whole group) walked to Fuensaldana one weekend and got the key to the castle and went up on the roof. It was really cool. Hoping to be in Valla in July. Loved the light story!
March 13, 2012 at 11:01 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Leonard "Gomez" Glick
Member
Posts: 8

Thanks for reminding me of Noche y Dia.  We also spent many days and nights there.  Another place was the Alcazar on a street corner leaving the Plaza Mayor toward la Universidad.  Another bar nearby (can't remember the name) had hand drawn pictures of the Beatles (White Album) on the mirror behind the bar.  Six years later when I went back,  the bar was closed but I looked through the window and saw the images of the Beatles still on the mirror.

March 19, 2012 at 4:43 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Joan Stossel Pun
Member
Posts: 6

Paula Husar Fromm at March 13, 2012 at 11:01 PM

Some of my favorite moments in 1970 were spent at Noche y Dia on the Paseo de Zorilla. Several of us spent lots of time there. We did like the pinchos at El Campero. No one has mentioned a professor named Irene Vallejo, she was the other female teacher along with Maria Victoria when we were there. Don Cesar was friends with my Spanish father. I remember doing things with the family like going to Burgos for mass in the Cathedral and kneeling near the grave stone of El Cid. We(the whole group) walked to Fuensaldana one weekend and got the key to the castle and went up on the roof. It was really cool. Hoping to be in Valla in July. Loved the light story!

Paula,

Sounds like you had a good family and did some great things.  One of the things that bugs me now is that the Burgos cathedral and many others- Segovia, etc. charge an admission to see them.  On the back of the Burgos cathedral- or say "front" because it's the entrance by the famous photo, there is a sign that people can enter to pray but I see that they have it closed off from the rest.  I wonder what they do for masses on Sunday.  This cathedral admission seems to be very prevalent in Spain- less so in France, shall we say.  They don't charge admission to go to the Notre Dama, Sacre Coeur or any of the others in Paris.

Bars - the café del Norte was still there till recently when I saw it closed- hope they are not renovating - it had all its old, dark wood at least in the beginning of this century.  we spent time after class at the Padova - which was at the end of the Plaza Mayor- the odd shaped part, and at Montesol which was across from the facultad, also until the first years of this century, but is gone now.  Places to have tapas were El Campero of course, Posada del mar and a lot of other places that were down steps to neat cellars- don't have names now- I will have to look at old napkins saved from them.  Outside town- La Abuela in Boecillo- still there but renovated.

March 19, 2012 at 5:12 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Susan McMillen Villar
Member
Posts: 2

Thanks, all for dragging me down memory lane. I was with Leonard with the group of '72. We loved the Campero, but beside the pinchos we would also order the perritos calientes. The barman there loved Elvis, so everytime we Americans went there, he'd put on Elvis' records on the juke box (even though we really didn't care). I loved the Socialista and I remember Noche y Dia. Apparently it was big with the group of '71. I think I was told that my sorority sister, Sue Leply used to pick up a guitar and play there. Did you play there Leonard? Didn't you bring a guitar with you or buy one there? I thought it was wonderful this December when I brought my adult sons to Valladolid and they'd go out at night and end up at the Caballo de Troya and other bars along the street running to Correos and talk to me about them like I'd never been there before ;-D

Oh, yes, and the Arranz family. Even though I lived with the Praderas, the Arranz's invited us over for advice about travelling and a drink to celebrate my 21st birthday. Pachi, their oldest son was a very good friend of my husband. Unfortunately we lost him in 1992 right before my husband was to be the best man in Luis Angel's wedding in Phoenixville, PA. Luis Angel had been our best man. Luis is now living near Philadelphia. Forty years have passed. Somethings have stayed the same, while others have changed drastically. Valladolid will always be one of the most important influences on my life!

March 31, 2012 at 10:40 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Leonard "Gomez" Glick
Member
Posts: 8

Susan, I can't believe you remembered that i had a guitar.  I bought it  in Herquedas music store near la Plaza de Espana (it's still the best sounding guitar I have).  I never played guitar in "Noche y Dia" since I only started playing the summer before;  but I played alot and learned fast with my Valladolid friends, Pepe, Freddie Diaz and their friend Alfonso in bars and small clubs, which served as  good training when I played in Bruno's restaurant my senior year.  Besides regular songs I love flamenco music of which I bought a cassette in 1978  that I listen to all the time.  While walking by the Pisuerga one day I heard the song "Caminito de la Playa"  by   Belen.  I heard it that one time but remembered it and finally found it on youtube a couple of years ago.

It was so great that you could take your sons there and have them "show you around".  There is a certain sense of pride and fulfillment in sharing that with loved ones or friends.  When I took my brother there in 1978 we stayed in the Arranz home( even in the same bedroom) and saw the same sights, many that you mentioned.  We still talk about it often.

In mentioning birthdays,  I turned 20 when I was there on May 6th;  which was the same birthday as the mother, Carmina Arranz.  That was also the day we made the field trip to Burgos.  I have a photo of Maria Celia Arranz with me there near La Catedral.  She may have gone with us because her birthday was the next day, May 7th:  which was also Mike Reich's birthday.

  Thanks again for mentioning the Arranz family and all the other reminiscences from that important and influential time.

April 1, 2012 at 9:21 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Joan Stossel Pun
Member
Posts: 6

That;s exactly what I said I missed - the guitar playing.  When we were there, I don't think any Americans played.  Three of us Gals bought guitars and took a few lessons from a blind gypsy but we did not continue.  But in each of these places there was usually a Spaniard who could play.  I never did get too good on the guitar but I can sing and love to when I get the chance- karaoke, anything...

Susan, do you know any place that still has a guitar and where they do this?  You have been back more than me and might know, if anyone.  Do you know that there is only 1 tuna left and that is "derecho"?  I have heard that they give performances for 200 Euros- yikes!  Too much to consider for our reunion.

I also like that you said that Valladolid will always be one of the most important experiences of your life.  Even for people who did not find their spouse there, it had to influence everyone in some way, if only that they learned that there are different ways of doing things in different countries - some may seem strange but they are usually well suited to the people of that country.

April 1, 2012 at 10:05 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Paula Husar Fromm
Member
Posts: 4

    For those of us in the group of 1970, Noche y Dia was a great place to go. My husband(then boyfriend) sent me a copy of Simon and Garfunkel's "A Bridge Over Troubled Waters" and we went to Noche y Dia to play it. There was a young guy named Alfonso who played the guitar and sang sometimes. Thank you for reminding me of Padova, we loved that place for a snack after classes. I lived on Capuchinos Viejos past the Campo Grande with a great family, the Legido-Moran family. THe kids were 4 and 5 when we were there and of course are no in their 40's! The father of my family was friends with Don Cesar Hernandez.  Bobbie Fabry lived with them in '69. They were a great family. 

     Cannot tell you how much of an impression our first trip to the swimming pool made on all of us. All those guys in itty bitty swimming trunks that were originally hidden under normal trunks.  :) 

  When my mom came to visit, we rented a car and travelled some on the weekends. My mom and Spanish mother got along really well even though they only talked mostly through pantomime.  My Spanish mom helped me buy my lace mantilla and headpiece for my wedding in Spain.  My mantilla came from Filipino ladies who worked at the Filipino Embassy in Madrid. My headpiece came from a shop in Valladolid. Talk about Valla making an impression on you.  Memories of Spain are great even though I have not been there in 15 years. But 15 years ago, Valla was a really booming place. 

Hope you all have a great reunion.    Paula

April 23, 2012 at 9:35 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Susan McMillen Villar
Member
Posts: 2

Hello, all,

It's getting close to reunion time. I hope those who had said they were going are still on board, so to speak. I will probably bringing along a dear friend from graduate school who is now a Spanish professor in Detroit. She studied at tht other city that begins with a V---Valencia. Two years ago she went to Valladolid to do some research in Simancas and fell in love the city just about as hard as the rest of us did. It should be fun. I'm psyched!

June 1, 2012 at 1:46 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Joan Stossel Pun
Member
Posts: 6

Hi Susan,

I'm glad your friend can go as well.  I am looking forward to meeting you both.

As of now, I can count 12 definites, with a few that are undecided as yet, plus 3 who live in Valladolid that we hope can join us.  Can't wait either.  Must finish a lot of plans that are have started. but I don't think it's a problem.  Just spoke yesterday with  a friend who has a typical restaurant outside of town where we will have lunch after the university presentation.  They will have a CD player there so we can play the old songs- there is nothing like songs to bring it all back!

June 2, 2012 at 8:46 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Clare Bretz
Member
Posts: 1

My new favorites are two casas rurales, Mirador del Valle in Villafuerte de Esgueva,34 km from Valla and Casa del Fraile in Zaratan,5 km, fom Valla. Highly recommend both as a different slant on places to stay and experience  the region. Mirador is ideal for day trips throughout the region and also close to Penafiel and the Ribera de Duero wine region.

Clare Bretz


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June 10, 2012 at 10:52 AM Flag Quote & Reply

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